Category Archive: BOAT

Marine Hardware | Materials Guide: Stainless Steel, Brass, and More

Marine hardware allows commercial, industrial, and recreational operators to customize their vessels, increase safety, and improve efficiency. There is a variety of boat rigging hardware that enhances the performance of a diverse range of watercraft.

Buying rigging made from corrosion-resistant materials ensures marine hardware holds up in harsh environments. Knowing what to look for helps watercraft owners find the right marine hardware for their specific needs.

Hardware Types for Marine Applications

Marine hardware fulfills many purposes on watercraft. Common rigging equipment includes:

brass_thumb2

  • Snap hooks are a versatile tool used to secure anchor chains, organize gear, tie down tarps, or customize pulley systems. Prepared boaters should always keep a supply of marine snap hooks on their vessels.
  • Boaters use rope cleats to secure ropes and knots. Rope cleats allow kayakers to customize their rig for comfort and stability.
  • Double-end hooks allow operators to create strong rope networks to support sails, secure fishing lines, and fasten diving gear.
  • Rings are another multifaceted tool that helps boaters secure loads and lines. Kayakers and rowers use them to keep equipment close while on the water.
  • Fixed, open, and swivel-eye snaps are flexible components for sailboats, fishing canoes, and pontoons.

Boat rigging hardware is an integral part of marine activities. Hardware made with the wrong materials sustains damage from sea salt, wind, and water. Environmental stress weakens the hardware and endangers lives and property.

bay-blue-boat-296242-510x409

Material Selection for Marine Applications

Corrosion-resistant metals protect vital marine hardware from degrading in aquatic conditions. Optimal materials for marine environments may include:

  • Durable brass alloys work well for underwater applications. Brass prevents submerged components from wearing away in salty or high-pressure waters.
  • Steel is a cost-effective solution for milder marine conditions. This material withstands sun and wind damage. Steel alloys may not be the best fit for those who frequent saltwater environments.
  • Stainless steel is attractive and highly resistant to rust. It’s also less prone to pitting and corrosion from salt water.
  • Die-cast zinc withstands high temperatures, making it ideal for protecting motorized equipment. Marine hardware made from zinc offers a wide variety of cosmetic finishes that complement exterior components.

Natural elements are the biggest threat to vessel safety. Choose corrosion-resistant materials to prevent weakened and compromised components.

Marine Rigging Solutions from Henssgen Hardware

Henssgen Hardware supplies commercial boaters and water sports enthusiasts alike with high-quality, corrosion-resistant marine hardware. Our selection of clips, snaps, and rings come in a variety of metals, finishes, and sizes to match your specifications at wholesale prices.

Browse our online catalog to find the perfect piece for your project or contact us directly for a quote.

Getting Your Summer “Toys” Ready for Storage with the Right Snaps and Hooks

If you’re asking, “Where did the summer go?” you’re not alone. We’ve already had early glimpses of autumn with cooler evenings and early mornings. If you live further north, some of the leaves may already be changing. If you’re a boat owner, you’ll want to take advantage of every sunny day before it’s time to store your summertime home away from home.

If you’re a new boat owner, it’s very important for the life of your boat that you perform key maintenance tasks. Here’s a handy list of “To Do’s” to check off:

  • When hauling your boat out of the water, be sure to have the hull cleaned, maintained and painted annually. Some people think they’re saving money by having these jobs done once every two or three years. However, that could really cost you in the long run.
  • If you’re a DIY boat-owner, make sure your rope lines are in good shape and showing no signs of fraying or separating from their metal fastenings.
  • Inspect your pulleys, snap hooks and clips to be sure they are also in good condition and free of rust.
  • Once your boat is out of the water, be sure to check your running gear, propellers, wiring, drains, bilge and through-hulls for wear and corrosion.
  • Once your boat is cleaned and serviced, you may also need to get the bottom re-painted to ensure your boat’s longevity and efficiency.
  • Check your canvas boat covers and tarps to make sure your snaps and clips are in good condition.
  • If you are a sailboat owner, check all lines, rigging and masts.
  • Check your canvas boat covers and tarps, as well as your rope lines and other hardware.

Knowing that you have a game plan in place for your fall maintenance and storage of your boat will allow you to enjoy these last few weeks of summer on the water with your favorite toy. When September or October arrives, you can rest assured that your boat will make it out of the water and safely on to dry land, instead of having no plan and a possible “dry dock” disaster!

Henssgen Hardware has a complete online catalog, with a comprehensive inventory of marine hardware and rigging equipment. Visit us at www.henssgenhardware.com/catalog/

Enjoying Summertime Fun While Staying Safe

Summertime is water sport season. Boating, jet-skiing, tubing, water-skiing and parasailing are just some of the many ways water and sun-loving fans enjoy sea, wind and surf.

In the height of the summer season, seaside and lakeside resorts handle crowds of summertime thrill-seekers, looking to get harnessed up and hitched to a slender nylon rope attached to a floating dock or a fast-moving boat, as they are transported aloft for a scenic parasail ride overlooking the vista below.

Others, who want to stay closer to mother earth, but who have a “need for speed,” may opt for wake-boarding, wind-surfing, water-skiing or tubing.

It goes without saying that those harnesses and slender nylon lines that keep skiers, boarders, parasailers and others tethered to their boat or dock are crucial to the safety of sport. Unfortunately, we’ve all heard of connections that break, boat drivers who don’t pay attention and lose their riders, or equipment malfunction that results in injury or even death.

That is why it is important to make sure your equipment is in good working order and “up to snuff.”

Skis, wake-boards and tubes

In addition to making sure that the boots and hardware on your skis or boards fits well and are in good working condition, it is important to check the nylon lines that connect your riders to your boat. Make sure there are no knots, kinks or frayed sections. If you’re pulling your precious cargo behind your boat with a tube, make sure that the dacron/nylon blend straps are in good condition and the safety Dee-rings and snap hooks are not rusted, bent or otherwise damaged. Those rings and hooks are all that’s holding your tube, board or skiers to your boat.

Well, almost.

The cleat on the aft deck of your boat is really the first line of defense against aquatic mishap and mayhem. All cleats should be checked for loose screws connecting the cleat to the body of the boat. This is particularly important if you have an older boat. It’s far better to err on the side of caution. Have a screw driver handy and double check every cleat.

If you happen to be towing a jet ski around on the water, it is even more important to examine all quick connecting snap hooks, D-rings and O-rings before heading offshore. You don’t want to lose your jet ski in a rough surf now, do you?

Parasails

 

While parasailing is an activity that involves relying on commercial providers, that doesn’t mean you can’t check in advance to make sure your parasail company has a good record and is up to date on their licensing.
Even on the day of your parasailing trip, don’t be shy about checking the body harnesses, D-rings and snaps to make sure they are in good condition.

Henssgen Hardware is a leading distributor of marine and sporting goods hardware. For more information, please visit our website. And, while you’re there, check out our catalog to see our complete line of products.

Turn Your Store or Marina Into a “Go To” Destination for All Your Customers’ Marine Hardware Needs

If you own a sporting goods store, a marina or even a gas station/convenient store on one of the several beautiful lakes in the area, it’s only a matter of time before warm weather finally arrives and people will be putting their sailboats, power boats, kayaks and canoes on the water. Maybe those boat owners failed to read our earlier blog post about being prepared and doing a thorough checklist of their boats in advance of the yearly launch.boat on deck

That’s why you need to be prepared for any requests your summertime sailors will throw at you. When it comes to marine hardware, it’s important to have in stock an ample supply of boat snap hooks, rope cleats, double end hooks, rings, and eye snaps with fixed, open and swivel ends.

There are so many things that require repair, maintenance or updating on a boat, whether it is a kayak or a cruiser. For your sailboat and power boat customers, snap hooks are important to keep on hand for anchor chains or trailer safety chains. They may be rusted, bent, broken – which would be unfortunate when trying to hook up to a mooring ball or getting a boat safely secured on the trailer.

Owners of power boats that pull water skiers, tubes and other flotation devices may need to replace their safety hooks, rings and snap hooks. The last thing they want to do is lose their precious cargo in the middle of a busy lake. When your customers pull into your marina to gas up and buy provisions, be sure to ask them if they’ve checked their skiing and tubing lines for signs of wear or broken connections.

Sometimes, summertime boaters are more focused on having an ample supply of ice, fishing line, and fresh brews on hand. You can grow your base of loyal customers by making sure to let them know you are their “go to” destination for a complete line of marine hardware. Before they head out for a day on the water, be sure to ask them if they need their anchors, rope cleats, safety snaps and snap hooks replaced.marine hardware - white rope on deck

Kayaks, canoes and rowboats also need to be secured safely to docks and mooring balls. And, no matter what type or size boat your customers have, they need to check their life jackets and bumpers to be sure that the rings, snaps and hooks are in good working order.

If your store is located near a salt water body, Henssgen Hardware offers a complete line of products that are salt-and corrosion resistant. Our complete line of marine hardware includes brass, steel, stainless steel and die cast zinc. A well-stocked marina or sporting goods store should keep an ample inventory on hand in all these materials.

white rope with snap hook - boat on deckFor marinas that service a large number of sailboats, it’s also a good idea to have a good assortment of rope hardware in stock. Rope cleats, thimbles and clamps in stock can mean the difference between a great day of sailing or a trip cut short because a sailor couldn’t find a marina with the equipment they needed to be “seaworthy.”

Henssgen Hardware has the hardware you need for a safe summer out on the boat. Download our catalog for all our product offerings.

Before It’s ‘Anchors Aweigh’, Get Your Boat Ready for Summer Now

It looks like Spring has finally sprung in the Northeast. Crocuses and daffodils are beginning to submerge from their long subterranean slumber and soon gardens will be showing off their warm weather colors.

Before you can say “April showers bring May flowers,” it will be time to get the boat ready for the water. Before you go ahead and launch your sailboat or power boat for a season of swimming, sunning and snorkeling, it’s a smart idea to make a pre-launch checklist and follow it carefully. Don’t have a list? Here’s a basic one that will cover most of the important components of your boat.

Electrical system

  • Check your batteries.
  • Clean the terminals and connections.
  • Wear safety glasses and gloves to protect against marine battery acids.
  • Check your boat’s running lights.

Safety equipment

  • Do an inventory and inspection of your life vests and flotation devices.
  • Check your fire extinguisher and get it re-charged if necessary.
  • Make sure you have at least one, if not two working flashlights and place them in readily accessible compartments on your boat.
  • Check your anchor. If it’s a motorized anchor, make sure the system is fully functional and the lines are in good condition and not frayed.
  • Check all your buoys.
  • Inspect ropes, lines and rigging.
  • Replace any frayed lines.

Equipment and hardware

  • Open and close your seacocks to be sure they’re working properly and no water has seeped in and frozen over the winter.
  • Make sure the hoses are double-clamped. If the clamps look rusty, replace them.
  • Replace broken, rusty or damaged hardware on your tarps and awnings.
  • Check any pulleys, boat hooks, and quick links to make sure they’re working and free of rust or corrosion.
  • Inspect all rope cleats to make sure they are properly secured. Replace any loose screws and bent or damaged cleats.

Swab the deck…and underneath too

  • Thoroughly wash the exterior of your boat before putting it into the water.
  • Check all crevices, including the propeller and other hard-to-get-at areas for any possible algae, mold or organisms. Most lakes, like Lake George, Lake Champlain, and other smaller lakes, will not allow you to launch your boat if they discover any suspicious algae or organisms on the hull of your boat.

Paperwork

  • Check your boat registration to make sure it is current.
  • If you trailer your boat, check that registration as well and check the wiring so other vehicles will see your brake lights and turn signals.
  • Make sure you have the proper launch stickers for whatever body of water you’ll be putting your boat in during the summer. If they’re expired, you can usually buy a new one right online.

A few hours of inspection, inventory and maintenance and repairs can save a whole lot of headache and frustration in the middle of the lake or stuck on the launch. Getting your boat ready now ensures that you and your family will have a safe, secure and fun season on the water.

Henssgen Hardware, located in Glens Falls NY, has been supplying rigging, boat hooks, snap hooks, pulleys, rope and other rigging hardware for the marine industry for 39 years. Visit their website and their online catalog for more information.

Brass vs Bronze? What’s the difference?

There have been times that I’ve seen bronze and brass items being marketed in the same categories but they are quite different not only in their make up but also in appearance. Here is some information that will help guide you in determining which would be best for your project.

First, bronze dates back to 3500 BC with the Sumerians, also leading to the Bronze Age. Through its discovery, people were able to create more detailed metal sculptures and building materials (decorative tiles), a larger variety of tools, weapons, and armor. Bronze was a much stronger and more durable alternative to stone and copper.

Brass was introduced around 500 BC.  Brass is made from an alloy of Copper and Zinc. Since Zinc is rarely if ever found in its natural state, early on people discovered melting copper and calamine (a zinc ore) yielded a golden colored tarnish resistant metal.  It was quite useful due to a high melting point and it’s malleability.

Below is a Comparison Chart that will clearly highlight the similarities and differences between the two metals:

 Brass vs Bronze

Brass Bronze
Composition: Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc. Bronze is a metal alloy consisting primarily of copper, usually with tin as the main additive, but sometimes with other elements such as phosphorus, manganese, aluminum, or silicon.
Properties: Higher malleability than zinc or copper. Low melting point (900 c); flows when melted. Combinations of iron, aluminum, silicon & manganese make brass corrosion resistant. Susceptible to stress cracking when exposed to ammonia. Not as hard as steel. Hard and brittle. Melts at 950 centigrade but depends on amount of tin present. Bronze resists corrosion (especially seawater corrosion) and metal fatigue more than steel and is also a better conductor of heat and electricity than most steels.
Color: Muted yellow, somewhat similar to gold, but duller. Reddish brown.
Uses: Decorative; Low-friction applications (locks, gears, doorknobs, ammunition, valves); Plumbing/electronics; Musical instruments for acoustic properties; Zippers & uses where it’s important to negate spark(fittings & tools around explosive gas), boat and marine hardware Used in boat and ship fittings, propellers and submerged bearings because of resistance to salt water corrosion. Widely used for cast bronze sculpture; Bearings, clips, electrical connectors and springs; For top-quality bells and cymbals.
History: Brass was first known to exist in about 500 BC. Bronze dates to about 3500 BC.

* www.diffen.com

 

Our Brass Snap Hooks and both the Brass Boat Snaps and Brass Swivel Eye Bolt Snaps are solid brass. Our customers use them for a variety of purposes ranging from pet leashes, handbags, fashion accessories, military purposes, and much more.  They are durable in the outdoors and an attractive snap to include on your products.  Our Brass Rings are also used in many industries and fields.

For more information about our brass line of snaps and rings, check out our brass page.

Choose from: